Landform Update: New Topography Nodes

I am excited to announce that there are some new nodes in the latest Landform update. These nodes are written in C#, and if you are interested in taking a look at the source code, I also now have a repository for Landform on GitHub. Shout out to John, over at sixtysecondrevit and creator of Rhythm and Monocle, for getting me going on these.

Most of these new nodes are focused on editing Topography, which is something that I have always wanted to do in Dynamo.

Here are the six new Topo nodes:

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Revit and Landscape Architecture: The Benefits

The third and final article about BIM and Revit in landscape architecture is now up on World Landscape Architecture:

As a landscape architect, I am sometimes asked by architects ‘Why do you use Revit?’ And the answer is quite simple: for all of the same reasons that architects and building engineers do. This may seem obvious to anyone familiar with the program and its capabilities, but to the uninitiated this explanation is not sufficient.

So to more clearly explain the benefits of using Revit, I created this diagram which outlines seven main points as they relate to several larger, overarching concepts: information, automation, and collaboration. Most of these benefits overlap in various ways and can also be found in other BIM software, so it is worth noting that they are not necessarily unique to Revit.

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Revit and Landscape Architecture: The Issues

After a bit of a hiatus, my second article about BIM and Revit in landscape architecture is now up on World Landscape Architecture:

Anyone who is familiar with BIM and BIM software has almost undoubtedly heard of Revit. Revit is a fairly popular BIM platform, particularly among architects and building engineers. It is less commonly used by landscape architects, and is frequently declared as “unsuitable” for landscape modeling. Yet the reasons behind this verdict are often left unexplained, which is not helpful for those who would like to understand more about Revit and the BIM process.

So in an effort to share more specific and useful information pertaining to BIM and landscape architecture, here are some of the biggest issues and challenges that I have discovered while using Revit, both generally and as a landscape architect.

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How to Make (Non-Adaptive) Fences Follow Topo

One of the very first Dynamo blog posts I read demonstrated how to place an adaptive fence component so that it would follow Topo. At the time, I thought it was an interesting concept, but not overly useful since I typically use non-adaptive fence components and fences will frequently step (instead of slope) with grade change.

However, not all fences are stepped, and I recently decided to take a look at trying the same concept on a non-adaptive fence. It is quite a bit more complicated than the adaptive version, but there are several reasons why you might not use an adaptive fence component and the concept can also be used to place a stepped fence.

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