Import Shapefiles with DynamoGIS

A few months ago, I posted about how you could use the Elk package to bring GIS data from Open Street Map into Dynamo. Open Street Map is a great resource if you do not have access to other GIS data. But if you do have other GIS data, such as shapefiles, then Elk is not very useful.

However, there is another package that can import shapefiles into Dynamo: DynamoGIS. For some reason, this package does not appear on the package manager website, but you can find it if you search the package manager from inside Dynamo.

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BIM and Landscape Architecture: What, Why, and How?

I am partnering with World Landscape Architecture to write a few articles about BIM and Revit in landscape architecture. The first article went up today:

Many landscape architects get hung up on the concept of BIM (Building Information Modeling), simply because it contains the word ‘building’. But BIM is really just the next technological progression in the AEC industry. It is a shift from creating printed drawings of the landscape, to creating and coordinating data within a digital model of the landscape. In some ways, the switch to BIM is perhaps more difficult than the switch to CAD because it requires a substantial change in the processes that have been in place since hand drafting.

Continue reading (on WLA) →

Get Floor Boundaries with Spring Nodes

Finding the boundary lines of an element is something that I have been trying to do in Dynamo for a little while now. There are several different tasks that you can automate in Revit once you have the boundaries of an element. First, you can automatically draw Area Boundary Lines for your planting plans. And particularly for Floors, you can use boundary lines to create duplicate Floors.

So I was quite pleased to discover Collector.ElementSketch in Spring Nodes. Continue reading

How to Make (Non-Adaptive) Fences Follow Topo

One of the very first Dynamo blog posts I read demonstrated how to place an adaptive fence component so that it would follow Topo. At the time, I thought it was an interesting concept, but not overly useful since I typically use non-adaptive fence components and fences will frequently step (instead of slope) with grade change.

However, not all fences are stepped, and I recently decided to take a look at trying the same concept on a non-adaptive fence. It is quite a bit more complicated than the adaptive version, but there are several reasons why you might not use an adaptive fence component and the concept can also be used to place a stepped fence.

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