Placing Annotations in Dynamo

I recently had a reader reach out and ask if is is possible to place Spot Slopes on every face of a Floor with Dynamo. Though there are no nodes (both ootb or custom) that I know of that will place a Spot Slope, you can still achieve a similar result by calculating slopes and putting those slopes into Generic Annotations.

This method can be used to place any number of symbols, annotations, or even detail components in a specific view.

Continue reading

Custom Slope and Elevation Grading Family

Typically, when grading a site, an engineer or landscape architect will specify new spot elevations based on desired slopes and existing spot elevations. Grading is mainly just drawing lines across various areas and interpolating spot elevations based on slopes.

While Revit’s current hardscape and Topography tools are not ideal for grading a landscape, it does have the capability to calculate slopes and spot elevations for you. All you need is a custom family with some parameters and formulas set up the right way.

Continue reading

Plan Notes: The Basics and Some Tricks

Of all the features in Revit, one of the simplest and most widely used across all disciplines is the Plan Note, with its corresponding Note Block Schedule. Once you are accustomed to using Plan Notes in Revit, you will never want to do them in AutoCAD again.

plan_note01

Using Plan Notes is quite easy. As such, it is a good process for new users to become familiar with schedules. But even an experienced user can utilize a few extra tricks to make their Plan Notes and Blocks work a little more efficiently. Continue reading

Grading Plans, Part 1: Generic Annotations

One of the most versatile families in Revit is the Generic grading01_symbolAnnotation (this is the same as the Symbol, on the Annotation ribbon). It is commonly used to create symbol-like families, such as keynotes, north arrows, graphic scales, and stamps. But it can also be used to generically annotate a drawing/ view.

In typical Revit standards and best-practices, it is almost always preferable to use a Tag, since a Tag pulls actual information from the object. Generic Annotations are better than just “dumb” Text, but unlike Tags, they will not update if any information about the annotated object changes.

Grading plans are one of the few exceptions to using Tags. Continue reading