Landform Update: New Topography Nodes

I am excited to announce that there are some new nodes in the latest Landform update. These nodes are written in C#, and if you are interested in taking a look at the source code, I also now have a repository for Landform on GitHub. Shout out to John, over at sixtysecondrevit and creator of Rhythm and Monocle, for getting me going on these.

Most of these new nodes are focused on editing Topography, which is something that I have always wanted to do in Dynamo.

Here are the six new Topo nodes:

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Revit 2017: Curbs from Railings

If you follow any sort of Autodesk news, you probably already know that Revit 2017 was released last week. Even though Autodesk only officially announce the release this Monday, the new features have been somewhat public for the past week since the Revit 2017 online help documentation was discovered.

Besides the change in the logo, Revit 2017 seems to be following the trends of Revit 2015 and 2016, with little fanfare and quite a few smaller changes (and no really big changes). In the architectural world, the two features that seem to have risen to the top of the list are the Text Editor and Depth Cueing.

While I can certainly appreciate those two features, as someone who is concerned with site and landscape workflows, they do not quite make the top of my list. Continue reading

Calculating Length of Curb

One of the greatest advantages to using Revit, is its scheduling capabilities. If you model your landscape and hardscape accurately, you can create schedules that pull almost any area, quantity, or value, which is great for cost estimating.

schedule_paving01

This is easiest to do with families and parameters that Revit has by default. Floors, for example, come with an Area parameter that automatically calculates the area of any and every floor in the model. But even if a system family does not have the parameters that you want, there is often a way  Continue reading

Hardscape Part 3: Curbs

Once you have a Hardscape base (see Part 2), creating a curb in Revit is quite simplehardscape03_model in place. There are a few ready-made tools that can be used to make curbs, such as Soffit, Facia, Gutter (in Roofs), and Slab Edge (in Floors). However, none of these tools will work on a sloping and curved edge. But these tools are simply a profile swept along an edge, which can also be done by simply modeling in-place.

The Model-In Place tool is under Component, on the Architecture ribbon. Continue reading